Are you like me in that it drives me crazy when I purchase $50-$60 dollars of produce weekly and I don’t get to consume every last bit of it before some of it gets spoiled. Well,  I have been on the hunt to find out what the perfect methods are to keep them fresh.  And this is what I have come up with.
I found this great chart that shows you which should be refrigerated and which should be left out on counter. 
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I learned a few great tips from this chart.  First, I need to stop placing my onions in the same basket as my potato’s.  Second you should; 
Know Which Fruits and Veggies Produce Gas
Fruits and veggies naturally emit an odorless, harmless, and tasteless gas called ethylene, and some produce it in greater quantities than others. When ethylene-producing foods are stored next to ethylene-sensitive foods, the gas will speed up the ripening process of the other produce. This is great if you need to ripen a piece of produce, for example, pair an apple with an unripe avocado. However, if you don’t want to speed up the ripening (or decay) process, store or keep the following fruits and veggies separate.
Produce That Creates Ethylene Gas: Apples, apricots, avocados, ripening bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, citrus fruit (not grapefruit), figs, grapes, green onions, honeydew, ripe kiwi fruit, mangoes, melons, mushrooms, nectarines, papayas, passion fruit, peaches, pears, peppers, pineapple, plums, prunes, tomatoes and watermelon.
Produce That Is Damaged by Ethylene Gas: Asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, cucumbers, eggplant, green beans, kale, kiwi fruit, leafy greens, lettuce, parsley, peas, peppers, potatoes, romaine lettuce, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes, watercress and yams.
Next you should know the life expectancy timelines;
Follow These Food Storage Guidelines
Produce Storage Life Expectancy

Apples

refrigerator (loose, not in bag)

up to 1 month

Apricots, Nectarines, Peaches, Plums

counter until ripe, then refrigerate in a bag

2-4 days

Artichokes refrigerator, in a bag 1-2 weeks
Asparagus refrigerator, trim stems, upright in a jar of water 3-4 days

Avocados

counter, store uneaten portion with the pit intact in a bag in the fridge

3-4 days

Bananas

counter

2 days

Berries & Cherries

covered in the fridge. Don’t wash until you use them (too much moisture in the package speeds spoilage).

1-2 days

Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cauliflower

refrigerator, bag in the crisper

4-7 days

Carrots

refrigerator, take tops off

2 weeks

Celery

refrigerator, wrapped in aluminum foil

1-2 weeks

Citrus

room temperature of 60-70 degrees

1-2 weeks

Cucumber

refrigerator, bag in the crisper

4-5 days

Eggplant

cool, dry, dark place (counter, cupboard, basket)

3-4 days

Garlic

unpeeled – cool, dry, dark place;

peeled – sealed container in refrigerator or freezer

unpeeled – several months;

peeled – several weeks in refrigerator, months in freezer

Ginger store in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks, then freeze remainder

if refrigerated – 2-3 weeks; if frozen – 2 months

Grapes refrigerator, in a bag 1 week

Green Beans & Peas

refrigerator, in bag or container

3-5 days

Greens (lettuce, kale, spinach, cabbage)

refrigerator, bag in the crisper

1-2 weeks

Herbs (fresh)

refrigerator, trim stems, upright in a jar of water

1 week

Kiwis

counter until ripe, then refrigerate in a bag

3-4 days

Mangoes, Melons

counter until ripe, then refrigerate in a bag

4 – 7 days

Mushrooms

cool, dry dark place (counter, cupboard, basket) in a bag

2-3 days

Onions

cool, dry dark place (counter, cupboard, basket)

2 months

Pears

counter until ripe, then refrigerate in a bag

3-4 days

Peppers

refrigerator, bag in the crisper

4-5 days

Potatoes

cool, dry dark place (counter, cupboard, basket)

1-2 weeks

Root vegetables (radishes, beets, turnips)

refrigerator, leave greens on

1-2 weeks

Squash

cool, dry dark place (counter, cupboard, basket)

4-5 days

Tomatoes

counter, uncovered; refrigerate if very ripe

2-3 days

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